Hurricane Sandy Becomes the Highlight of Twitter

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“THINK IMA DESTROY A STARBUCKS. I COULD REALLY GO FO A PUMPKIN SPICE LATTE RIGHT ABOUT NOW,” posted a fake twitter account titled Hurricane Sandy.

Seems like a funny thing someone might say right? Well the funny thing is, people are really saying things like that in the United States right now.

Hurricane Sandy has been classified as “post-tropical” after hitting the southern coast of New Jersey reaching top winds of 80 mph. This traumatic hurricane flooded New York recently and has left eight million people without power. The strong winds are spreading over much of the Mid-Atlantic States and Northeast. Lake Michigan and Lake Erie could have lakeshore flooding.

Flooding and wind gusts are not the only things that Hurricane Sandy has brought. There was a recorded 26 inches of snow at Redhouse in Garrett County of Western Maryland. Blizzard conditions have been reported as well as whiteout conditions being possible. All of these conditions were reported on October 31.

None of those conditions sound funny, do they? Well viewers and participants on Facebook and Twitter would think differently. Recently on Twitter, the “cool” thing to do has been to post jokes about the damages Hurricane Sandy has created. Giving the hurricane personified features, changing lyrics of songs to relate to the hurricane and making inappropriate jokes have been occupying the time line of twitter users. For example, things like “storm storm go away dats whut all da haters say,” posted a twitter account changing the songs from a popular hip-hop song No Hands by Waka Flocka.

“They have nothing better to do than make an fake account about a hurricane,” Loy Norrix senior Troy Swodzinski said. People literally make an account on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram and relate it to the hurricane, joking about some of the damage that the hurricane has created. It’s difficult to differentiate via the web knowing what is sarcastic and what is not. When people make fake accounts it is almost like putting up a fake picture or faking their own identity.

“People don’t take things seriously until it’s their life”, junior Iyana Smith explained, “It’s only until someone can relate to it that they start to worry.”