Power Wednesday Creates an Atmosphere of Professionalism in the Loy Norrix Halls

jakeheasley

PW Potential pic
Andrew Blinkiewicz, a sophomore, tries not to spill food on his dress shirt. This is Blinkiewicz’s first Power Wednesday.

On the first Wednesday of every month, students put on their Sunday best and dress up for Power Wednesday. If you look hard enough, you may notice a tie, a suit or maybe even a dress. Power Wednesday, a program that started in November 2012, is an optional activity in which students dress up like they are going to a professional job.

The first Power Wednesday was a huge success, roughly 250 people participated, and some even dressed up the Wednesday after that, unaware that Power Wednesday is only the first Wednesday of the month.

“Our goal with Power Wednesday is to make the real world transparent for students so they know what the expectations of them will be,” said Principal Johnny Edwards. “Two-hundred and fifty students participated last month, so I would definitely call it a success.”

Almost 20 percent of the student body participated in Power Wednesday on the first day alone. Many others who didn’t realize that the event was once a month dressed up every Wednesday of November. Not only does this prove that Power Wednesday is not just a passing fad, but it also shows that there are students who care about their future after high school.
Principal Edwards isn’t the only person who is pleased by the success of Power Wednesday. Assistant Principal and Head of Security Jeffery Boggan has noticed a significant change in attitude of students who participate in Power Wednesday.

“I notice a change in their [the students] walk, a change in their attitude, even a change in the way they communicate. With the number of students that have participated [250] you do see a change in them, and when you see that difference, you will see a difference in the culture of the entire building,” Boggan said.

“I dressed up for Power Wednesday because I wanted to contribute to the school spirit, and it was fun,” said Kimberly Romph, a freshman.

There may have been 250 students who participated in Power Wednesday, but there are also people who don’t see the point in the activity. Lois Rustenholtz believes that dressing up does nothing to prepare students for post high school life.

“I don’t think there is really a point to Power Wednesday because it’s just dressing nice and being uncomfortable for the entire day,” said Rustenholtz. “I think dressing up does nothing to prepare people for after high school, because it’s just clothing.”

Despite some pessimism, Power Wednesday is here to stay.