Our Sun Has Lost a Friend: Loy Norrix Teachers are Surveyed About Pluto’s Planetary Status

Artists sketch of Pluto based on a picture taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. Pluto was discovered on February 18, 1930

Artists sketch of Pluto based on a picture taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. Pluto was discovered on February 18, 1930

When it comes to planetary status, “Some things never change,” said Ryan Allen, economics teacher at Loy Norrix. The debate over whether Pluto is a planet or not was discussed and decided by the International Astronomical Union without the public having any say in the matter. Pluto was stripped from its planetary status, and that’s just too much for some people to handle.

In August 2006, Pluto lost its mighty status of being called a planet. Pluto is now classified as a dwarf planet instead of an “actual” planet.  A Dwarf planet is an object in a solar system that is neither a satellite nor big enough to be an actual planet. If the old definition of a planet still held true then we would have to classify many asteroids or dwarf planets as planets,  which would create a list of hundreds of planets revolving our sun.

When it comes to the teachers surveyed at Loy Norrix, 65 percent teachers tend to side with the astronomers, while the rest of the teachers either have an emotional attachment to Pluto or just want things to stay as they were pre 2006.

So what’s your view? Are you attached to this chunk of ice in our planetary system, or do you side with scientific fact?

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