Communities in Schools hires success coach to help Loy Norrix students academically and socially

Riley Dominianni, Feature Editor

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Here at Loy Norrix, there are multiple schoolwide resources for students. Whether it be social, academic, or career-oriented problems students are facing. This school year, a new, unique position was created by Communities in Schools: someone equipped to handle all three. Her name is Nazlhy Heredia, and she is the Loy Norrix High School success coach 

Situated in the B-wing, her office is a welcoming, cozy space open to all students. The walls are lined with informational materials and positive sayings. At any time during the day, she is available to help.

Heredia’s room is located right next to B11. Her door is decorated with “safe space” and “safe to tell” signs, indicating that students have a home there.

 

“I have lots of students come with many things. Some have work stuff, personal stuff or family stuff, and some struggle in school for many other reasons. My job is to connect with them in a way that helps them stay focused, be successful, and foresee a life after high school. I want them to have a light at the end of these four years,” said Heredia. 

Heredia comes from the Dominican Republic, where she earned a degree in and practiced psychology for 18 years. When she moved to the United States in 2005, she was an immigrant and single mom of two young children who held many different jobs to provide for her family. She said that these experiences shaped her into the person she is today. 

Once in Michigan, Heredia worked in a middle school as a site coordinator for a school district in Grand Rapids. Then, when a position opened up at Loy Norrix, she eagerly took the opportunity and moved to Kalamazoo.  

“I love working with high schoolers, it’s my favorite population. Immediately I thought, oh my god, I want to be at Loy Norrix,” Heredia said. 

Heredia is very happy with her decision. “I like that it’s so diverse,” she said. “I can reach out on so many different levels in so many different ways. I love it.”