Freshmen transition to high school

Freshman+Nina+Molitor+and+Hannah+Locke+enjoy+eating+lunch+in+the+cafeteria.+After+morning+classes+some+social+time+with+friends+is+much+needed.+%0A

Photo by Gigi Fox

Freshman Nina Molitor and Hannah Locke enjoy eating lunch in the cafeteria. After morning classes some social time with friends is much needed.

Gigi Fox, Opinion Editor

Walking into Loy Norrix for the first time can be overwhelming and unnerving. We all know the feeling of walking into a new place and not knowing what to do. The class of 2023 had this feeling on September 3rd. 

According to SchoolDigger, Maple Street Middle School only has 808 students, Millwood Middle School has 735, and Loy Norrix has 1,613, doubling in size. 

Coming to high school is one of the biggest stepping stones in a student’s life. Being able to pick certain classes that you are interested in or that suit your goals is a luxury that comes with being a high schooler. Transitioning from six classes to five may take some time to get familiar with. Classes are also an hour and ten minutes rather than just one hour like in middle school. 

“I like it [longer classes] more, less walking and you get to sit down. There is more time to learn about things,” said freshman Zach Lacey.

Norrix’s halls are notorious for crowds and loitering. Navigating the herds of people and getting from one side of the school to another in less than five minutes takes some time getting used to.

“That’s [crowds] a little bit rougher, at Maple [Street Middle School]. There was a line down the hallway, and if you were on the right side, you would go that way and if you were on the left, you’d be going the other way. They don’t have that here, which I like, it’s just a hodgepodge of people,” said freshman Merrie Crawford.

Going from being told where you need to be and what classes you need to take, and now getting the freedom and opportunity to tailor your schedule to you can be a nice power rush. Students can take advantage of their resources and privileges by getting ahold of their counselor and knowing their options. 

“Need help with… test anxiety, social anxiety, career exploration, PSAT/SAT/ACT resources, suicidal thoughts, conflict resolution, college applications, college visits, financial aid, scholarships, anger management, graduation requirements, family issues, friend issues, teacher issues, attendance and transportation, your counselor can help! …and yes, we can help with your schedule, too. You can make an appointment to speak with your counselor by emailing them, or by stopping in the Counseling Office, located in the K Wing by the main office,” said counselor Becky Parsons.

Ms. Robinson, A-E: [email protected]

Ms. Parsons, F-K: [email protected]

Ms. Learner, L-R: [email protected]

Mrs. Washington, S-Z: [email protected]

Being informed on classes and extracurricular opportunities can help sculpt your high school career. Participating in sports is one way to make the most of high school. 

“It’s [swim team] helped a lot with, one being more active because I’m usually not that active, and two it gave me a head start to making some new friends for the beginning of the year since we started swim three weeks before school started,” said freshman Rayna Sorrentino.  

Middle school teachers tend to feed eighth graders the false statement that teachers don’t help you succeed in high school and you can’t rely on them to slow things down.

“They [middle school teachers] made it sound like we were not going to have a lot of fun, and it was going to be very hard,” said freshman Aiden Miller.

Coming into high school, many freshmen are realizing this misconception is just a myth. Teachers are meant to be an advisor, mentor, leader and if you’re lucky, a friend.

“They [middle school teachers] use it as a scare tactic because many eighth graders aren’t ready for high school. I agree [that teachers are an advisor, mentor, leader and friend] because the transition to middle school to high school is a huge step, and I say that because there are biological, emotional as well as academic challenges kids face when coming to high school. There is a difference between a teacher and an educator, a teacher will do their job because they have to, but an educator wants to help you and teach you about life and the responsibilities that life entails,” said educator Niambi Pringle.